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Gambling Addiction
Gambling addiction (also called gambling disorder, compulsive gambling or pathological gambling) is the first process addiction disorder to be formally recognized by the American Psychiatric Association (APA). In the latest edition of the APA&rsqu...

Gambling addiction (also called gambling disorder, compulsive gambling or pathological gambling) is the first process addiction disorder to be formally recognized by the American Psychiatric Association (APA). In the latest edition of the APA’s diagnostic manual, the DSM-5, gambling addiction is grouped together with substance use disorder. Gambling addiction is defined as “persistent and recurrent problematic gambling behavior” leading to significant psychological, social or occupational dysfunction. According to the diagnostic criteria in the DSM, gambling addiction is associated with a preoccupation with gambling, a need to bet more money more frequently, restlessness or irritability when attempting to cut down on gambling activity, “chasing” losses, and the continuation of gambling behavior despite obvious negative consequences.

 

Submitted by: Cosette Rae, MSW, LICSW, ACSW, CDWF
CEO, Founding Member, Program Director, reSTART
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Generalist Programs
Generalist Programs - For the purpose of this website, the generalist residential programs provide stability and structure but with the emotional competence necessary for treatment of general teenage and emerging young adults issues; they do not i...

Generalist Programs - For the purpose of this website, the generalist residential programs provide stability and structure but with the emotional competence necessary for treatment of general teenage and emerging young adults issues; they do not intentionally accept the myriad more complex diagnoses that require specialized populations or treatment structures..  The programs in this category have varying levels of care from the most restrictive to the least restrictive.

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Good Lives Model (GLM)
The Good Lives Model offers a respectful and engaging treatment model for sexual offenders.  “A central assumption of the GLM is that offending results from problems in the way an individual seeks to attain primary human goods… (...

The Good Lives Model offers a respectful and engaging treatment model for sexual offenders.  “A central assumption of the GLM is that offending results from problems in the way an individual seeks to attain primary human goods… (for example,  happiness, relationships/friendships, and experiencing mastery in work and leisure activities). Identifying the primary goods that are most important to clients, and those that are implicated in the offence process, constitutes a fundamental component of assessment because treatment explicitly aims to assist clients to attain these primary goods in personally meaningful, rewarding, and non-harmful ways in addition to addressing re-offence risk.” (From the Visiting Experts presentation, Ward, Yates, & Long, 2006; Yates, Prescott, & Ward, 2010; Yates & Ward, 2008; http://www.unafei.or.jp/english/pdf/RS_No91/No91_10VE_Prescott.pdf.)

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Gottman Method
Drs. John and Julie Gottman’s couple therapy “supports and repairs troubled marriages and committed relationships, but strengthens happy ones.” In finding that couples’ interaction had enormous stability over time, they als...

Drs. John and Julie Gottman’s couple therapy “supports and repairs troubled marriages and committed relationships, but strengthens happy ones.” In finding that couples’ interaction had enormous stability over time, they also discovered that most relationship problems (69%) never get resolved but are “perpetual” problems based on personality differences between partners. Gottman Couple Therapy evolved out of Dr. John Gottman’s early lab and the research/evidence-based underpinnings continue to reinforce this methodology.

https://www.gottman.com/about/the-gottman-method

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